"For the word of the Lord is truth, and whatsoever is truth is light..."
July 20, 2006

Humility?

“I think that many of us, when Christ has enabled us to overcome one or two sins that were an obvious nuisance, are inclined to feel (though we do not put it into words) that we are now good enough. He has done all we wanted Him to do, and we should be obliged if He would now leave us alone. As we say, ‘I never expected to be a saint, I only wanted to be a decent ordinary chap.’ And we imagine when we say this that we are being humble.

“But this is the fatal mistake. Of course we never wanted, and never asked to be made into the sort of creatures He is going to make us into. But the question is not what we intended ourselves to be, but what He intended us to be when He made us. He is the inventor, we are only the machine. He is the painter, we are only the picture. How should we know what He means us to be like? You see, He has already made us something very different from what we were. Long ago, before we were born, when we were inside our mothers’ bodies, we passed through various stages. We were once rather like vegetables, and once rather like fish: it was only at a later stage that we became like human babies. And if we had been conscious at those earlier stages, I daresay we should have been quite contented to stay as vegetables or fish — should not have wanted to be made into babies. But all the time He knew His plan for us and was determined to carry it out. Something the same is now happening at a higher level. We may be content to remain what we call ‘ordinary people’: but He is determined to carry out a quite different plan. To shrink back from that plan is not humility: it is laziness and cowardice. To submit to it is not conceit or meglomania; it is obedience.” — C. S. Lewis, Mere Christianity

While ‘Brother’ Lewis, not being afforded the Plan of Salvation ‘lectures’, erroneously surmises that we never intended to be like Heavenly Father, he rightfully asserts that perfection is what He intends.  I enjoy this thought so very much because he astutely points out how - if left to ourselves - we would settle for something way below ‘our privileges.’  Thankfully, and unlike ourselves, He has not forgotten premortal promises.